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#102 : Adieu la vie

 

Synopsis :

Alors qu'elle rentre du marché, Olivia Benson assiste à une terrible scène : une jeune femme vient s'écraser sur une voiture après avoir visiblement été poussée de la fenêtre de son appartement situé au sixième étage d'un immeuble. Olivia et Elliot apprennent que la jeune femme, Gretchen Quinn, était écrivain. Au moment où elle est tombée de sa fenêtre, elle était uniquement vêtue  d'un slip.

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3.91 - 11 votes

Titre VO
A Single Life

Titre VF
Adieu la vie

Première diffusion
27.09.1999

Première diffusion en France
06.03.2001

Diffusions

Logo de la chaîne TF1

France (inédit)
Mardi 06.03.2001 à 00:00

Logo de la chaîne NBC

Etats-Unis (inédit)
Lundi 27.09.1999 à 00:00

Plus de détails

ÉPISODE 002

Écrit par : Miriam Kazdin 
Réalisé par : Lesli Linka Glatter 

Acteurs principaux Christopher Meloni (Elliot Stabler) - Mariska Hargitay (Olivia Benson) - Richard Belzer (Sergent John Munch) - Dann Florek (Capitaine Don Cragen) - Michelle Hurd (Monique Jeffries)

ApparitionsDennis Boutsikaris (Dr. Mark Daniels) - Laila Robins (Ellen Smith) - Paul Hecht (Robert Sodarsky) - Isabel Gillies (Kathy Stabler) - Michael Gaston (Buddy) - Matthew Arkin (Mark Daniels' Brother & Attorney) - Erin Broderick (Maureen Stabler) - Holiday Segal (Kathleen Stabler) - Patricia Cook (Elizabeth Stabler) - Jeffrey Scaperrotta (Dickie Stabler) - Angie Harmon (A.D.A. Abbie Catmichael) - Michael Nouri (Dallas Warner) - Leslie Hendrix (Dr. Elizabeth Rodgers) - Walt MacPherson (Detective Mourad) - Leslie Lyles (Dr. Chatman) - Liam Craig (Hawkins) - Keenan Shimizu (Grocer) - Randy Lutterman (Neighor) - John Elsen (Policeman #1) - Lou Bonacki (Policeman #2) - Douglas Mcinnis (Trent Peterson) - Virginia Louise Smith (Page) - Clyde Baldo (Little Suit) - Julia Murney (Waitress) - Mike Wiggins (Waiter) - Cliff Thorn (Yuppie Guy) - Mary Hammett (Yuppie Girl) - Chris Orbach (Detective Ken Briscoe) - Welly Yang (CSU Technician) - Andrew Boyer (Maître D') 

Scene opens with Benson picking out a tomato at a corner grocery store)

Grocer
Tomatoes, two for 50 cents — special.

Benson
(handing him the tomato to put in a bag)

Just one.

Grocer
(Annoyed that Benson isn't taking him up on the deal)

Four for a dollar!
(grabs the additional items in her arms)

Benson
I only need one.

Grocer
Pity.
(hands Benson the bag of groceries)

Benson
(hands him some cash)

Tragic.
(smiles at him and walks off)

(As she walks, she sees a bunch of people gathering around an ambulance and a bunch of police officers.  She goes to check it out.)

Benson
Excuse me, police.

Policeman #1
Step aside, make room here.
(lifts the yellow tape so she can get through)

Benson
Benson, Special Victims Unit.  Jumper?

Policeman #2
Jumpers open the windows first.  Cleared the sidewalk, nailed the car.

Benson
Oh, God —
(looks up at the window and walks over to the car)

Excuse me.
(Reaches the car and is obviously troubled by what she sees.  A dead woman, her face and arms all bloodied, is lying on top of a car.)
Anybody notify SVU?

Policeman #3
'Cause she's not wearing panties, you mean?

Benson
(disgusted by the remark)

Just cover her up!
 


 

(Cut to inside the woman's apartment, some crime scene investigators are standing around talking, Stabler arrives and talks to the lead CSI)

Stabler
Hey — what are we looking at?

Detective Mourad
(leading Stabler into the living room)
No sign of forced entry, two glasses of half-drunk wine, two clean sets of prints — lovers' quarrel.

Stabler
Lover's quarrel — they usually kiss and make up.

Tech
(holding up a condom wrapper)

Detective — pack of ultra-ribs.

Detective Mourad
(turns to Stabler)

Looks like maybe they did more than kiss.

Benson
(annoyed by the comments)
Yeah, he read her a little Walt Whitman, they made hot, passionate love, then right before he rolled over and fell asleep, he heaved her out the window — excuse me — through the window.

Detective Mourad
I'm not sure what this outburst is leading up to.

Benson
Rape.

Detective Mourad
(laughs)

Like I said, no forced entry.

Benson
I didn't say it was a stranger.

Detective Mourad
Plus, she wasn't exactly dressed in her “refusal” outfit.

Stabler
I didn't hear you say that.

Detective Mourad
I didn't catch your shield.  Are you with the “political correctness squad”, or what?

Stabler
(showing him his badge)

Elliot Stabler, Special Victims Unit.  My partner, Detective Benson, and I were called in on an apparent homicide with obvious sexual overtones.

Detective Mourad
All right, you want it?  Fine — you take it.
(in the background)
Scootch, Jacoby, let's move it.

(Stabler walks over to Benson, who is looking down at the woman from the broken window)

Detective Mourad
(background)

Okay, guys, wrap it up.  We're outta here.

(Camera zooms in on a picture of the victim — which Benson hands to Stabler — before getting a picture of the crime scene)
 

Opening Credits
 

(Scene opens to pictures of the victim strewn over Stabler's desk, two of them in Stabler's hands)

Stabler
Eight stories up, eight down.

Cassidy
(grabs one of the pictures)

Looks like she was shot out of cannon.

Cragen
Guy on steroids?

Munch
No, the Yankees are on a road trip.

Stabler
(standing up)

Yeah, they're down in Baltimore, kickin' a little Oriole ass.

Benson
How about plain old testosterone-driven rage?

Jeffries
Her boyfriend?

Munch
Or girl.
(talking to Jeffries)
You could toss 100 pounds without breaking a sweat.

Jeffries
Toss you, you skinny-ass geek.

Munch
See?  The rage?

Cragen
What about the neighbors?

Stabler
Nobody knew her beyond the usual nod and wave.

Benson
She worked at home — all they knew was she carried a laptop with her.

Munch
The whole thing's a pyramid scheme.

Cassidy
What whole thing?

Munch
(pacing)

Laptops — we've become a nation of “laptoppers” — writing orders on our laptops, more laptops — whatever happened to pens?

Jeffries
(ignoring Munch's tangent)

Vic had an appointment with a Dr. Daniels every Tuesday and Thursday at 5:15.

Cragen
Alright, check her address book.  What did she do, the vic?

Benson
She was a writer — “Street Crazies: Budget Cuts and the Mentally Ill” ...
(handing some articles to Cragen, then to Briscoe)
...by Gretchen Quinn.

Cragen
“The Short Life of Alice H.” — about a suicide.

Briscoe
“Designer Vaginas — Is This Health Care?”  New York Ledger.

Jeffries
(thumbing through the victim's rolodex)

Michael, Steven, Sam W. — all men... Daniels, Mark — clinical psychology at 911 East 72nd Street.

Munch
(sits next to Jeffries)

“How to Build a Better Orgasm,” in Cosmopolitan.  Somebody might kill for this.

Cragen
(Looks at Stabler and Benson)

You two — check the neighborhood again.

Stabler
Yo!

Cragen
Cassidy, you're in court tomorrow on the “Subway Stroker” case, is that correct?

Cassidy
Yes, sir.

Cragen
Okay, you get hung up, you call me.
 


 

(Cut to Stabler and Benson in Gretchen Quinn's apartment; Stabler pushes the button on the answering machine)

Recording
This is Gretchen.  Leave a message.  Bye.

Electronic voice
You have no messages.

(Stabler punches the button on the answering machine again)

Recording
This is Gretchen.  Leave a message.  Bye.

Electronic voice
You have no messages.
 


 

(Cut to the detectives outside the apartment building.  Benson is talking to a woman)

Neighbor
I heard some roughhousing, like someone throwing something.

Benson
And then what?

Neighbor
That scream, then “crunch,” and the car alarm going off.

Benson
Did you see anybody leave her apartment?

Neighbor
What, like I was supposed to stick my head out and look?  Right — so he could see my face.
(walks off)

(A couple approaches Benson)

Yuppie Girl
Excuse me, how long does that girl's apartment stay a crime scene?

Benson
Why?

(Stabler walks up)

Yuppie Guy
'Cause we're next on the list for a one-bedroom.

(Benson, disgusted with the couple, shakes her head)

Stabler
Oh, what's your name?

Yuppie Guy
Jason Cargill.

Stabler
Well, Mr. Cargill, I'm with the real estate board — you're now off the list.
(takes out a notepad and starts to write on it and walks off; the couple looks excited)
 


 

(Shot of building, then down to Benson and Stabler, looking up at the building)

Benson
Half of them admitted they couldn't tell their neighbors from the perp.

Stabler
Could you?

Benson
Could I what?

Stabler
Tell your neighbors apart?

Benson
Why, because I live here?  What?  I'm never home!  I'm always with you!

Stabler
And people say the suburbs are anonymous.

Benson
Oh, now Queens is a suburb?  Since when?

Stabler
Since we got a little space, some trees, grass to mow.

Benson
Yeah, I got a regular 8x10 of you out there, mowing the lawn.

Stabler
I do — sometimes.

Benson
Oh, admit it!  Kathy does all the housework 'cause you're never there!

Stabler
Okay, I admit it, Kathy's the man of the house.

Benson
Exactly.

Stabler
Till Dickie's old enough.

(Benson chuckles)

Stabler
You're lucky — you got nothing to worry about.  Definitely got no lawn to mow.

Benson
Yeah, I'm a regular monk.

Stabler
Monkette.

(Stabler stops and watches Benson as she puts something in the back seat of the car)

Benson
(looks up and sees Stabler watching her)

What?

Stabler
Nothing.
 


 

(Cut to Stabler putting his hand down the garbage disposal at his house)

Stabler
Did you give Sears a call?

Kathy
I called Sears.

Stabler
And...?

Kathy
And the limited warranty expired.

Stabler
Well, how the hell did that happen?

Kathy
How the hell do I know?  You're the one that wanted to buy the garbage disposal and install it yourself.

Stabler
Wait a minute — Wait a minute.  I installed this properly.  It's — if you guys would just stop throwing so much crap down it.

Kathy
Maureen, would you get off the phone, please?

Maureen
(on the phone)

I gotta go.

(Stabler flips the switch and the disposal rumbles.  Proudly looks at Kathy.)

Dickie
(runs in)

Mommy, Mommy, have you seen my turtle?  I left him in the sink.

(Kathy gives Elliot a look; Stabler looks at Kathy, then down at the disposal)
 
 

SUPREME COURT
TRIAL PART 16
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21

 

Abbie
And when you asked the defendant what was he thinking at the time of the assault, what did he say?

Cassidy
He said he thought, uh, she was smiling at him, so he took a seat next to her.

Abbie
The number 3 train at...what stop was it?

Cassidy
96th Street.  I believe the defendant's a professor at Manhattan University.

Abbie
So, he took a seat, and then what happened?

Cassidy
He commenced to strike up a conversation with her but then, upon receiving no response, he surmised she was asleep.

Abbie
Mm-hmm.  And then what did he do?

Hawkins
Hearsay, Your Honor.

Abbie
Then what did Professor Ormond tell you he did next?

Cassidy
He put his hand inside of her blouse, and then took her hand and placed it on his p... on his, uh...
(looks at judge)
genital region, and then, and then he made her rub him until he c...until he reached his intended goal.

Abbie
No further questions, Your Honor.

Hawkins
Detective, how did this become your case?  Were you on duty in the subway at the time of the alleged assault?

Cassidy
No.  A passenger alerted a member of the Transit Police, who made the arrest.  The case was then referred to the Special Victims Unit.

Hawkins
Of which you're a member?

Cassidy
Yes, sir.

Hawkins
For how long?

Cassidy
Let's see... eight months.

Hawkins
So you're an expert on sex crimes — is that correct?

Cassidy
Well, we all something to learn.

Hawkins
I'm sure.  Can you tell us the technical, or “psycho-sexual” term, if you will — for fondling a stranger?

Cassidy
(thinking)

Fromage...?

(scattered chuckles)

Hawkins
I believe it's “frottage.”

Cassidy
Right, right — “frottage.”

Hawkins
Now, since the passenger in this case turned out not have been sleeping but was in fact deceased, what would you call that?

Cassidy
You know, I don't know what it's called, but I call it disgusting!

Hawkins
You disapprove on moral grounds, but since the so-called victim, being dead, couldn't have know she was being fondled, or “fromaged” by the defendant, where is the assault?

(shot of Cassidy rolling his eyes, speechless)
 


 

(Cut to Cragen in his office, staring at a bulletin board and playing with a pocket knife; Benson and Stabler walk in)

Stabler
You look about as happy as a postal worker at Christmas.

Cragen
So, make me feel better.

Stabler
We brought back a bunch of papers from her apartment.  No threatening letters from ex-boyfriends, not even a message on her answering machine.  This woman makes J.D. Salinger look like a Shriner.

Cragen
Tell me about it.  Not one person in her life knows she's dead yet.  You believe that?

Stabler
Jeffries struck out with the next of kin?

Cragen
Yeah.  On her lease application, she left “Notify in case of emergency” blank.  If he killed her inside, and left her there, she could have been there for weeks, months.

Benson
God, could you imagine living like that?  
(Stabler looks up at her, Benson catches the look)
What?

Stabler
(looks away)

Still a lot of “Jane Does” on the books, years later.

Cragen
Not on ours.  Somebody knows her story.

Benson
Her shrink.

Cragen
Okay, her shrink.
 
 

OFFICE OF DR. MARK DANIELS
911 EAST 72ND STREET
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21

 

Dr. Mark Daniels
(opens the door to his office and sees Benson and Stabler)

Oh, hello.  Uh, listen, folks, I don't accept walk-ins or couples.  In fact, I'm expecting a patient.

Benson
We're not a couple.

Dr. Mark Daniels
Well, in any event —

Stabler
(showing Dr. Mark Daniels his badge)

Your patient won't be coming in today, Doctor.

Dr. Mark Daniels
What do you mean?

Stabler
She's dead.

(shot of Benson and Stabler walking into Dr. Daniels' office)

Benson
We've been unable to locate a next of kin, a boyfriend — any close friends.  We're hoping you could help us with that.

Dr. Mark Daniels
You know I can't do that.

Benson
We know — “doctor-patient blah, blah, blah.”  We could get a court order to help you out of your ethical quagmire.

Dr. Mark Daniels
(opens Gretchen's file)

Well, Gretchen's parents are dead.  She has a sister named Ellen Travis out in the Denver area.

Stabler
Fiancé, boyfriend?

Dr. Mark Daniels
Not that she mentioned.  She was a very private person.

Benson
Except with you.

Dr. Mark Daniels
That's what I get paid for.
 


 

(Cut to the morgue; through the window, you can see Rodgers is on the phone, but waves Benson and Stabler in.)

Benson
The shrink didn't even ask how she died, did you notice that?

Stabler
He was trying his best not to answer our questions, probably figured he shouldn't ask any either.

Rodgers
Lacerations from the glass.  Broken neck, ribs, lumbar.

Benson
Before or from the fall?

Rodgers
From.

Stabler
Any sign of a struggle?

Rodgers
Uh-uh.

Benson
Well, the neighbor said that she heard a lot of commotion before the fall.

Rodgers
It must have been consensual commotion then — no contusions, no internal abrasions.

Benson
A gun to the head wouldn't leave an abrasion.

Rodgers
I'm on your side, Detective.
 


 

(Cut to Benson and Stabler in the squad room)

Benson
I left messages for everyone the shrink gave up, including the sister in Colorado.  Voice mail, voice mail, voice mail.  Doesn't anybody pick up the phone anymore?

Stabler
She was hiding from somebody.

Benson
A violent ex?

Stabler
Exes.
 


 

(Cut to the detectives in Cragen's office)

Cragen
I thought the shrink said “no boyfriend.”

Benson
Ah, he seemed uncertain.

Stabler
He seemed uncooperative.

Cragen
Well, you're gonna have to make good on your threat — get a court order and compel him to stop his pussyfooting.

(phone rings)

Stabler
Jackson.

Cragen
(answering the phone)

What?  Elliot.
(hands the phone to Stabler)

Stabler
Stabler... Yeah... Good... Get outta here... Any priors?  Thanks a lot.
(hanging up the phone)
I gotta tell ya, I love computers.

Cragen
The print on the wine glass?

Stabler
Matched one they got on record on Albany.

Benson
State prison?

Stabbler
New York State Department of Psychiatry — a Dr. Mark Daniels.

Benson
Her own shrink?

Cragen
Well, I guess the pussyfootin's over.
 


 

(Cut to Benson and Stabler questioning Dr. Mark Daniels with his lawyer present)

Attorney Daniels
I'm sorry, my brother wants to be helpful, but legally his hands are tied.

Stabler
His hands were in her apartment.  We lifted some very well-educated prints from a glass of wine.

Benson
Dr. Daniels, can you explain when and why you were visiting your patient?

Attorney Daniels
W-w-w-w-wait — he was in Miss Quinn's apartment briefly at lunchtime, at her request, to attend to a crisis.

Benson
Or an erection?

Dr. Mark Daniels
That's insulting.

Stabler
Really? I thought it was the absence of one that was insulting.

Attorney Daniels
Whoa — what's your point?!

Benson
The point is, what was your brother doing in her apartment?

Attorney Daniels
A brief professional consultation.  He returned to the office at 2:30 to attend to patients for the rest of the day.

Stabler
Doctor, where were you that evening — say, around 8:00?

Attorney Daniels
You know, I don't think I —

Dr. Mark Daniels
(holds up a hand to stop his brother)

I was at a fellow therapists — a lady fellow therapists — having dinner at her apartment.  I got there around 6:30 and left there around 9.

Stabler
You got a name and number on your “lady fellow therapist” friend?
 


 

(Cut to Benson and Stabler exiting the elevator with Dr. Mark Daniels' “lady fellow therapist” friend)

Dr. Chatman
Dr. Mark Daniels was at my apartment last evening from about 6:30 till a little after 9.

Benson
Do you have a doorman, or was anyone else home?

Dr. Chatman
No, can you tell me what this is about?

Stabler
Maybe you should ask the doctor about that.

Dr. Chatman
Dr. Daniels is extremely busy.

Stabler
Yeah, I'll bet.  You know any other women he's getting “busy” with?

Dr. Chatman
(clearly offended by that remark, keeps her voice low)

We have a professional relationship.  I have absolutely no interest in his personal life.  Excuse me.
 


 

(Cut to Stabler and Benson exiting the building)

Benson
Think she's lying for him?

Stabler
Who can tell?  

(cell phone rings, Benson reaches into her pocket for her phone)

Stabler
It's me.
(answers his phone)
Stabler.  Hey — Buddy, thanks for getting back to me so quickly... No, no, no — this is about a woman.  She wrote for ya —
(looks at his watch)
Perfect.  See you then.
 
 

THE NEW YORK LEDGER
705 WEST 44TH STREET
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21

 

Buddy
How you been, Elliot?

Stabler
Good, everything is good.

Benson
(shakes Buddy's hand)

Hey, how you doin'?

Buddy
Well, you're better-looking than Alfonse.

Benson
Thanks.

Buddy
What happened to “Big Fatso”?  Coronary?

Stabler
Retired and moved to Florida.

Buddy
Ah — same diff.

(Benson takes a picture out of a file she is carrying and shows it to him)

Stabler
You know this woman?

Buddy
I don't think so, no.

Benson
(hands him another picture)

What about her?

Buddy
Oh, yeah, the girl who was defenestrated on 82nd Street.  I saw the photo in the competition.  See, we don't go much for death scenes.

Benson
Her name was Gretchen Quinn.

Buddy
No — you sure?

Stabler
Found your name in and number in her rolodex — thought you could help us out.

Buddy
Man — I-I talked to her on the phone once or twice — when she called to say she liked a certain column, but I never met her.

Benson
You ran some of her articles.

Buddy
I'm a columnist, honey, not an editor.  She was just another by-line to me.  
(looking at the picture)
Wow, she was kind of a —

Benson
A what?  A “stone-cold fox”?  A “babe”?

Buddy
(chuckles and looks at Benson)

No, you're a babe — And a stone-cold fox.  No, this girl — this is some deep, deep well you'd fall into.
(handing the pictures back to Benson)
What a waste.
 


 

(Cut to Benson and Stabler at a hotdog stand)

Stabler
Maybe Munch is right — people should get off their computers.

Benson
(cradling her cell phone between her ear and her shoulder, she is writing something down — looks up at the hot dog)

Relish.

Stabler
Relish.
(to the hot dog stand guy)
Get out, rub elbows — what do you think?
(the guy nods in agreement as he piles some relish onto the hotdog)

Benson
(still on the phone)

Uh-huh.  Right.

Stabler
A little more relish.

Benson
(still on the phone)

Thank you.
(hangs up her phone)
Her credit card shows a regular series of expensive dinners for the last year.  The last one at “Il Posto Vecchio” for $372.

Stabler
Not cheap.
(hands Benson her hot dog)

Benson
Nope.  Ah, grazie.
 
 

IL POSTO VECCHIO
99 WEST 54TH STREET
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21

 

Maitre D'
So many beautiful faces to remember.

Stabler
Oh, dumb me —
(pulls out his badge and shows it to the guy)
Will this help jog your memory?

Maitre D'
(has a smirk on his face until he sees the badge)
She was with one of the anchors — not local either.  National.  But then, they all look the same.

Waitress
I remember her.  She was with Dallas Warner.  Got a serious tip.

Stabler
Oh, you did, huh?  You know, those anchors, they make a lot of money.

Waitress
Not from him — from her.  Guess she was his boss.  I love that!
(walks off)
 


 

(Cut to news room)

Dallas Warner
We got a lead with repercussions to the Senate run.  She was an incredibly riveting interview.

Benson
I'm sure she was, but we're here about Gretchen Quinn.

Dallas Warner
She related to Sally?  My wife and I are having dinner with her in Georgetown next week — Ben, too, if he gets back from Europe.

Benson
(getting annoyed)

Not Sally, Gretchen — she was also a writer.  I believe that you knew her.

Dallas Warner
(talking to his hair stylist)

Is there anything that you can do with this?

Stabler
Mr. Warner...

Dallas Warner
(to his hairstylist)

Excuse us.

Stabler
Yes or no?

Dallas Warner
Knew her?  Does anybody ever really know anybody?

Stabler
Don't get philosophical with us — you're just a teleprompter jockey, we're just cops.

Dallas Warner
I haven't seen her in over a month.

Benson
Were you on the air last night?

Dallas Warner
No, I'm off Saturday through Monday.  I was having dinner with my wife last night — there's a maitre d” and a room full of waiters who know that I was there.
(writes something on a piece of paper and hands it to Stabler)
I assume you can confirm this without contacting her.  If you'd like a picture of her, I'd be happy to provide one for you.

Page
On in five, Mr. Warner.

(Cut to a shot of Dallas Warner through the teleprompter)

Dallas Warner
Good evening, I'm Dallas Warner.  White House sources today —

Benson
(turns to Stabler)

He's either a sociopath or he really believes his line of B.S.

Stabler
Sociopath.

Benson
What does he think, he's the second coming of Walter Cronkite?

Stabler
Yeah, well, he was kind enough to grant us an interview.

Benson
Yeah, like he was doing Gretchen a favor by having her on the side.

Stabler
Hubris.

Benson
Tell me about it.

Stabler
He's already figured that her death is less important than his life, his career — oh, man.

Benson
What?

Stabler
I just know, a guy like that — his alibi's gonna check.
(walks off)

Benson
(takes one look back at Dallas Warner and follows Stabler)

Bastard.
 
 

THE BLACK PEARL
727 EAST 86TH STREET
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22

 

Waiter
Mm-hmm.  A couple of days ago.  How could I forget?  She was having drinks with that gorgeous anchorman.  What's his name?  “Warner”?  “Warren”?  Whatever.

Benson
Dallas Warner.

Waiter
Him.  She didn't look happy, though.

Stabler
Why is that?

Waiter
Women?  Who knows?  I should have such problems.

Benson
Professional unhappiness, or personal?

Waiter
She was stroking his arm, crying, he was sitting up straight, looking around.  I see this scene a hundred times a week, baby, and the body language?  It was personal, as in — the man was already gone.  Is that all?
 


 

(Cut to Benson and Stabler entering Dallas Warner's office)

Dallas Warner
Please.
(motions for the detectives to enter, closes the door, looks at his watch)
Yes, I was with her Monday night.  When you told me she was dead, I was shocked.

Stabler
Funny, you didn't look shocked — you seemed rather... cool, in fact.

Dallas Warner
I was being discreet, Detective.

Stabler
Ah.

Benson
Being discreet and lying to the police are two different animals.

Dallas Warner
(ignoring Benson's comment)

I was good for her.  Before me, she'd been with a bunch of lying psychos.

Benson
You know any of the other liars' names?

Dallas Warner
No.  I was safe — exactly what she needed.  I called her often and returned her calls promptly.

Benson
What happened the last time you saw her?

Dallas Warner
She called me up crying.  I asked her if she wanted to meet me for a drink — I had some time before dinner.  As soon as I sat down at the table she told me that she had been sleeping with her psychiatrist — it had been going on intensely for a couple of weeks.

Stabler
Why would she confide in you?

Dallas Warner
'Cause I'm a good listener.

Benson
When you want to get into somebody's pants.

Dallas Warner
If you want to get snotty, Detective, I'll call my lawyer and you can forget about mutual cooperation.

Benson
Then I'll call your lawyer and ask him if you killed Gretchen.

Dallas Warner
And why would I have done that?

Benson
To keep her from blabbing to your wife?

Dallas Warner
That's enough.

Stabler
Excuse us, one second, will you?
(takes Benson's arm and leads her out of the office)
Detective Benson... why don't you go down, talk to Carmichael at the D.A.'s office, and let's see if we can get that O.B.B. started, okay?

(Shot of Benson and Stabler in the hall, Benson looks  frustrated)

Stabler
You want me to bust him in the grill?

Benson
Hmm.

Stabler
We're not getting anywhere in there.

Benson
It's not we — it's me.

Stabler
What's that mean?

Benson
The pompous jerk will never condescend to deal with a woman — you go in there.

Stabler
We good?

Benson
We're good.

(Stabler walks back towards the office, Benson walks the other way)
 


 

(Cut to Stabler joining Dallas Warner on the rooftop of the building)

Dallas Warner
Everything all right, Detective?

Stabler
Oh, yeah.  She's... you know.

Dallas Warner
Up here, you get a whole different perspective on people.

Stabler
Like ants?

Dallas Warner
Yeah, a bit.

Stabler
So, we were with Gretchen's shrink.

Dallas Warner
Yeah, she said that at first, it had been exhilarating...

Stabler
Yeah?

Dallas Warner
...him knowing all of her darkest shadows and falling for her anyway — all of that.  I said I thought that she should sue him.

Stabler
A little late for that.  You know, if you repeat what you told me about the therapist for say, a grand jury —

Dallas Warner
No, no, no, no — this was off the record.

Stabler
No, no, no — it's not a “60 Minutes” interview here.  This is a homicide investigation.

Dallas Warner
Still, it's your word against mine, and mine is trusted around the world.

Stabler
(amused at this guy's arrogance)

Oh... How about in your own home?  How good is your word there, Dallas?
 


 

(Cut to Stabler, Benson, and Cragen talking on the balcony of the squad room)

Stabler
Warner seems to have a solid alibi.  I don't think he'd offer up dinner with his wife in a public place if he were lying.

Cragen
We got the shrink's fingerprints at the scene — I'll get the DNA order on that if I have to.  Listen, I got a call about the body.  They need to make room in the morgue.

Benson
There's still no one to release her to?

Cragen
Hey, you tell me.

Stabler
Well, we got a sister in Denver, but as of now she remains as much a mystery as Gretchen.

Cragen
No memorabilia in her belongings?

Benson
Well, we haven't had a chance to sift through her stuff.

(Benson and Stabler both go to sit down at their desks)

Cragen
Uh, well, you know when a good time to do that might be?

(Benson and Stabler look at each other, stand up, and walk away)
 


 

(Cut to Munch and Cassidy walking down the hall)

Munch
From the Greek, Cassidy.  “Necro” — “death,” “philia,” — “love of.”  You try it.

Cassidy
Necrophilia.

Munch
Again.

Cassidy
Necrophilia.

Munch
Or, “Egyptian love,” according to Henry Miller.  Necrophilia.

Cassidy
Necrophilia.

Munch
Good man.
 


 

(Cut to an aerial view of items strewn all over Benson and Stabler's desks)

Stabler
She must have had fun naming her computer files.
(Flips open a file)
This is “Penis dot Quotes.”  You want to read it or should I?
(tries to hand it to Benson)

Benson
(flipping through a pile of old books)

Knock yourself out.

Stabler
(takes a look at the contents of the file and places it on Benson's desk)

No, that's yours.

(Benson grabs the folder and opens it up)

Cragen
Anything?

Stabler
No.

Benson
(reading from the file)

Okay, “Biology of the Amazons,” by Gretchen Quinn.  “There's a tiny catfish feared more than the piranha.  It's called a...
(flips the page)

Cragen
“Candiru.”

(Benson looks up, surprised that Cragen knew the answer)

Stabler
Say what?

Cragen
This is beautiful.  Tell him.

Benson
(reading)

“It will swim right into a man's penis and lodge itself there by erecting sharp spines — ” Ow.

Stabler
“Erecting sharp spines — ” that's a fish with a sense of irony.  How'd you know that?
(flipping through an old book)

Cragen
In the jungle they always taught us, “Don't hold your nose, hold your stones.”

Stabler
(amused... Looks closer at the book in his hand and his face becomes serious)

Bingo.

Benson
Yearbook?

Stabler
Book of poetry by Sylvia Plath.
(hands the book to Benson)

Benson
(Takes the book)
Of course.

Stabler
Overdue 20 years from Patterson High School.
 
 

PATTERSON HIGH SCHOOL
EAST BERGEN, NEW JERSEY
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22

 

Stabler
(on the phone)

We're on our way back.  The victim's real name was “Susan Sidarsky.”  About 20 minutes.  Right.
(hangs up the phone)
Blood tests aren't in.  Shrink and his mouthpiece are.

Benson
Let me pull the hair out for the match, may I?
 


 

(Cut to the detectives, Dr. Mark Daniels, and his lawyer in an interrogation room)

Dr. Mark Daniels
Gretchen presented classic signs of childhood sexual abuse.  She was overly promiscuous, she was very seductive, she was constantly asking me whether or not I found her attractive.

Benson
Did you ?

Dr. Mark Daniels
(ignores Benson)

And then she told me her father started abusing her shortly after her 13th birthday.

Benson
Abusing her how?

Dr. Mark Daniels
Oh, must I be clinical?  Come on.

Benson
Yes, you must.  Emotional abuse?  Fondling?  What?

Dr. Mark Daniels
Intercourse.

Benson
In less clinical words, you mean “rape.”

Dr. Mark Daniels
(nods in agreement)

And the minute she graduated from high school, she ran.  She moved almost every year.

Benson
So, she stopped running when she got to New York?

Dr. Mark Daniels
Mm-hmm.

Benson
How often did you see her?

Lawyer Daniels
As a patient?

Benson
Yes, as a patient.

Dr. Mark Daniels
Twice a week.

Benson
That must get expensive, no?

Dr. Mark Daniels
She had a trust fund, although she told me she refused to touch it.  I — But it didn't matter — I just billed her insurance.

Stabler
About her sexual experiences...?

Dr. Mark Daniels
Well, it was anonymous and joyless with her.  She would take any man on the block, as long as she picked him before he decided on her.  She had a history of deranged lovers —

Lawyer Daniels
Any one of whom could have killed her.

Benson
Well thank you — thank you for being so open with us... Although, of course, you left out the part where you were her last deranged lover.

Lawyer Daniels
That's unfair.

Stabler
So is sleeping with a vulnerable patient who trusted you.

Dr. Mark Daniels
Listen, I never... I — uh...

Stabler
What?

Dr. Mark Daniels
I never meant to betray her.

Stabler
Yeah, but you did.  I think the psychiatry board is gonna take a very dim view of your betrayal.
(walks away)
 


 

(Cut to Stabler in his bedroom talking with Kathy and getting ready for bed)

Stabler
Yeah, yeah, yeah — you got signs all over school about “stranger danger.”  How do you warn them about people they're supposed to trust?  Their priests?  Scoutleaders?  Future therapists?  You tell me — how — how do you tell children about this without having them be completely paranoid?

Kathy
(sitting on the bed putting on lotion)

We've had this conversation before, El.

Stabler
I know, I know.  It's just —

Kathy
Maureen got a “B” in algebra, which is a minor miracle and Kathleen's orthodontist said we might not have to have a whole retainer... so that should help.

Stabler
That's good.  You know, her therapist wasn't the only one doing her.  Her father.

Kathy
Her father?

Stabler
Yeah.

Kathy
Elizabeth made you a — a Play-Doh ashtray.

Stabler
I don't smoke.

Kathy
Course not.

Stabler
Oh... that's nice.  Where is it?

Kathy
Well, Dickie flushed it down the toilet.

Stabler
What a little prince.

(Kathy is kissing her husband, hoping to have an intimate moment with him, but all he can think about is the case he is on)

Stabler
How could anyone...?
(whispers)
Her father.
 


 

(Cut to Benson walking into the station house, Munch catches up to her)

Munch
Olivia.

Benson
Oh, good morning, Munch.

Munch
The vic's sister from Denver is here.

Benson
Here in the unit?

Munch
New York — two-bedroom suite, Midtown.  She's not exactly warm and bubbly.

Benson
Well, grief does strange things to people.

Munch
I don't think it's grief.  You got two sisters growing up in the same abusive household — what are the chances of it only happening to one of 'em?

Benson
Probably very slim.
(shakes her head in disbelief)
Damn it.

Munch
The vic went to impressive lengths to escape her family.

Benson
To escape her father — changing her name from “Susan” to “Gretchen.”
(opens her locker)
Gretchen is someone who never met Daddy Sidarsky.  She ran to a different city, she ran from man to man trying to find comfort.
 


 

(Cut to Cassidy talking to Benson and Munch in the squad room)

Cassidy
Did you know that necrophilia is not only with dead people?

Benson
(looks at Munch)

Do you see what you started?
(shakes her head and pours herself a cup of coffee)

Cassidy
No, I got it off the Net.  Supposedly some famous actor out in Hollywood, hires hookers to lie in an ice bath — waits 'till they turn blue with the cold before diving in.

Munch
(patting Cassidy on the back)

Let's move on.  “Compulsive onanism.”

(shot of Jeffries shaking her head and Stabler looking very amused)

Cassidy
(looks at Benson)

“Onanism.”
(chuckles)

(Benson looks at Stabler and laughs)

Cragen
Hey — the Quinn girl's sister?  She's here.

Stabler
(fixing his tie)

Got the release forms?

Benson
Um-hmm.
 


 

(Cut to the detectives walking into a room in the station house)

Benson
Mrs. Travis?  Olivia Benson.  My partner, Elliot Stabler.  We're the detectives on your sister's case.

Ellen Travis
Oh.

Stabler
Why don't you have a seat?
(places the release forms on the table and dangles a set of keys in front of Mrs. Travis)
These are the keys to your sister's apartment if you'd like to drop by, maybe take some family items.

Ellen Travis
(takes a seat)

Not that there'll be any.

Benson
Why do you say that?

Ellen Travis
I haven't talked to my sister in over 20 years.  About two months ago, she started calling me out of the blue saying that she wanted a relationship.

Benson
And?

Ellen Travis
Well, it was superficial, to say the least, and then it stopped.

Benson
Still, you've been the only relative we've been able to locate.  Your sister was somewhat of a... mystery.

Ellen Travis
She was a drama queen, Detective.  No one could ever figure her out.

Stabler
I thought she was nine years old when you left for Colorado.

Ellen Travis
Well, nine-year-old girls are complicated.

Stabler
Tell me about it.  If you'd like to use the phone to call your relatives about the funeral —

Ellen Travis
My father's dead.  And what funeral?  I'm in New York to sign the papers, go to Saks, and take the next plane home.
(finishes with the papers and gets up to leave)

Stabler
Well then we won't keep you any longer.  Thank you for your time.

(Mrs. Travis is already out the door before Stabler finishes what he is saying)

Benson
Well, she was molested, you know that.  That cold facade of hers?

Stabler
Maybe it's just living in Colorado.

Benson
She dresses a little more “Fifth Avenue” than “Rocky Mountain.”

Stabler
(looks at Benson)

I'm having a “fashion police” blackout.

Benson
That outfit — Gretchen's shrink said that she never touched her trust fund.  I mean —

Stabler
(points behind him)

But this one —

Benson
It's...
(shakes her head)

Stabler
Who's paying?
 


 

(Cut to the detectives with Buddy at the “New York Ledger”)

Buddy
Don't you people have computer files of your own?

Benson
Yeah, 20,000 known sex offenders, all cross-referenced by proclivity and physical characteristics.

Buddy
(looks at Stabler)

Is that true?

Stabler
We can give you every pederast in Manhattan with a four-inch unit, but 401K's — that's a little out of our area of expertise.

Buddy
Trent Peterson?  Benson, Stabler.
(walks over and sits on Mr. Peterson's desk)
Benson, Stabler, Smith, and Fenwick.

Trent Peterson
How can I help you?

Buddy
Well, I was just telling them about the Business section's new system and how you can get financial data on anybody or any corporation in the free world.  Am I right?

Trent Peterson
Yes, but... did the M.E. clear this?

Buddy
(chuckles and points to the computer screen)

Peterson, I'm on a deadline.  The Sidarsky trust.
 


 

(Cut to the detectives talking to Cragen)

Cragen
So, the sister is dipping into the vic's trust fund?  Is that what we got here?

Benson
No, she had her own separate account.  Gretchen's just sat there and grew.

Cragen
Grew how?

Stabler
Three-and-a-half million and still climbing.

Cragen
Oh, really?  Well, that's a lot of money and a lot of motive.
(Stabler hands Cragen a folder)
What's this?  The inheritance?

Stabler
Not an inheritance — it's a trust.  A living trust, managed by her father.

Cragen
(walks into his office and turns around)

Whoa, whoa, wait a minute — I thought you said the father was dead.

Benson
Right, but we were misinformed.

Stabler
Robert Sidarsky lives and works in New Jersey.  You want to know his shoe size?

Cragen
I'll tell you what I want to know — I want to know the truth about these people.
 
 

LAUREL ATHLETIC SHOES, INC.
EAST BERGEN, NEW JERSEY
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23

 

(The detectives are walking through the shoe factory and are talking with Robert Sidarsky)

Sidarsky
All the creative people — our R&D, marketing, in-house ad staff — that's all done here in Jersey.

Stabler
But the sneaks are made where?  China?  Malaysia?

Sidarsky
For the most part, yeah.

Benson
Don't worry, Mr. Sidarsky, we're not here on child labor violations.

Sidarsky
We don't have any secrets here.

Benson
Oh, we all have secrets.

Sidarsky
(stops and looks at Benson)

Um... Could you please enlighten me?

Stabler
Your daughter's dead, Mr. Sidarsky.

Sidarsky
(becoming very upset

What — ?  No... No... No...
(shaking, eyes tearing up)
Does my wife know?  I have to call my wife.

Benson
Somebody threw her out of a window on East 82nd Street.

Sidarsky
(confused)

What?  That's impossible — my family is at the shore.  They're vacationing.  I was supposed to meet them on Friday.

Stabler
We have a positive identification, sir.  Your second child — born May 10th, 1967?

Sidarsky
(breathes a sigh of relief)

Susan... Susie was lost to me a long time ago.  Such a sad child.  Such a sad ending.  Well...
(hints for the detectives to leave)
 


 

(Cut to Benson and Stabler walking out of the factory)

Stabler
What do you think?

Benson
What do I think?  God I'd like to slap the crap out of him.

Stabler
Even if you get Gretchen's sister to come forward, the statute of limitations is long gone.

Benson
Maybe not.

Stabler
Meaning?

Benson
“Megan's Law.”  If we can pump the sister's memory, it'd start the clock all over again on the emotional abuse.

Stabler
I don't know, Olivia.  Recovered memory — that is such a rat hole.

Benson
So, it's worth a shot.

Stabler
It's not even gonna help our case.

Benson
Elliot, so maybe he's not her killer.  We slap a molestation case on him.  I'm worried about that little girl — that little girl that's down by the seashore waiting for Daddy to come home.

Stabler
Who's got a mother... who's still alive, and we can only hope is paying attention.

Benson
Hope?  Hope isn't good enough, Elliot.
 


 

(Cut to Benson looking up at Gretchen's apartment — a couple has moved in and is putting up a curtain over the window.  Benson stands there for a minute, thinking, then walks away.)
 


 

(Cut to Benson walking into Cragen's office — It's dark and everyone has gone home for the night.  Cragen sees her and pulls a bottle of alcohol and a glass out of his desk drawer)

Benson
I thought you didn't drink.

Cragen
I don't.  Doesn't mean you can't.

Benson
Oh, I'm fine... Elliot's home with Kathy and the kids and Munch is out somewhere.  Jeffries and Cassidy... We live here — we just disappear into the night.

Cragen
(sets the bottle and glass on his desk)

Back in Homicide, we used to go out together every night and get smashed.  We'd tell war stories, maybe fool around a little bit and feel like crap the next morning.
(sits in his chair)

Benson
(sarcastic)

This is better.

Cragen
Oh, much.

Benson
(sits in a chair across from Cragen)

So, why are you alone tonight?

Cragen
(pauses)

My wife was on an Orlando turnaround as a flight attendant, and I was home, scrubbing algae off the tiles around the swimming pool we never used — the one that got me into hot water with Internal Affairs because “what's a cop doing with an in-ground pool,” right?  And then the phone rang — the call she always expected, always dreaded.
(sadly)
So, Marge is... scattered in bits over some swamp... and I'm home in Bensonhurst trying to make sense of the test pattern on our giant TV... wanting so bad to drink again, hoping for a surrender — oblivion.

Benson
Kinda like our girl, the vic.  She slept with every guy on the block just to get to that same place — oblivion.

Cragen
You get inside her head, Olivia, and you will get to the perp.
 


 

(Cut to the next morning, all of the detectives are in the squad room)

Stabler
(throwing a piece of paper back and forth in the air)

What's his face, Warner — the “Peter Jennings” look-alike?  He's got a solid alibi.  Half the people on the Upper East Side knew he was stepping out on his wife.  You tell me — what's the motive?

Cragen
Then it's the shrink, yes?

Benson
No.  Again, what's the motive?  I mean, he did some damage, I'll admit, but —

Cassidy
Uh — psychic damage.

Munch
What are you “Mr. Insight” now?  Where'd you get that, “The Psychic Hotline”?

Benson
Hey, it was.  He raped her emotionally, but killed her?  No way.

Cragen
Okay, then who?

Stabler
I say you got to take a look at the father.

Cragen
The father, who hasn't seen her in 20 years?  Why?

Jeffries
Because she was in hiding from “Daddy Dearest”?  I mean, the shrink said the old man was cunning and still patient.

Munch
So, he finds out she's living in Manhattan, says to the new wife and kid, “Go get some fried clams, I got an errand to run in the city,” He goes, “Ding-dong, hi, it's Daddy,” and throws her out the window?

Cragen
Dr. Mark Daniels, the psychotherapist, was at the crime scene.  We've got his fingerprints on a wine glass and a pack of “ribbed ultra-thins,” as I recall.  So, would somebody please tell me why he is not in interrogation, even as we speak, being sweated by two of my best detectives.

Benson
It wasn't him.  It was the father.  What if she did cash one of her trust fund checks?  That's how he found her.  So, he goes over to her apartment, he walks in, she's banging the shrink, or the anchorman — he's possessive, jealous — all the usual crap.

Cragen
I don't know.  The new daughter, the young one — that's where his focus would be.

Munch
Maybe Gretchen was writing on a novel about how pathetic her childhood was.  Why not?  Everybody else is.

Stabler
(turns to Benson)

You got to get that sister to talk.

(Benson looks at Stabler and then at Cragen)

Cragen
Be my guest.
 


 

(Cut to Benson walking with Ellen Travis)

Benson
Mrs. Travis, what time does your flight leave?

Ellen Travis
Soon — not soon enough, but soon.

Benson
You want to get back to your children, I know.  And I'm sure they're anxious to see their mommy again.

Ellen Travis
They are, so, if you wouldn't mind...

Benson
It's just that I — I wanted to say I'm sorry that we were so rough on you the other day.

Ellen Travis
You're probably wondering why I didn't stay and protect my little sister.  Is that it?

Benson
I'm sorry.

(Mrs. Travis gets into the backseat of her chauffeur-driven car)

Benson
Wait, please don't go.  I — please.  Did you know that you have a little half-sister?  She's 10.

(Benson has Mrs. Travis' full attention now)

Benson
You know what's going to happen to her.

Ellen Travis
No.

Benson
The same thing that happened to you, Mrs. Travis.

Ellen Travis
It was her drama, not mine.

Benson
Please, Mrs. Travis, just listen to me.  It's your drama, too.  Now please, we can help.

Ellen Travis
(upset)

I have to go.

Benson
Just one more day... in a lifetime.
 


 

(Cut to the Ellen Travis and the detectives looking at Robert Sidarsky through the two-way mirror in the station house)

Ellen Travis
Can you imagine being a little girl in his house?
(opens the door to the interrogation room, ready to confront her father; Benson and Cragen watch through the two-way mirror)
Don't even think of touching me.

Robert Sidarsky
I — I — I only —

Ellen Travis
Only what?  Only want to make it feel better?

Benson
(turns to Cragen)

Can we use this?

Cragen
Let's just see where it goes.

Ellen Travis
You bastard.  You cowardly, disgusting, sick bastard.

Robert Sidarsky
Ellie, honey, sweetie-pie...

Ellen Travis
Shut up.  Is that what you call your new one?  Your little “sweetie-pie”?  “Give Daddy a taste of that sweet pie”?  Is that what you think you'll do?

Robert Sidarsky
I don't know what you're talking about.

Ellen Travis
No?  You killed Susie, how's that?  You killed her.

Robert Sidarsky
Listen, I talked to the police, and I wasn't anywhere near the city on that night.

Ellen Travis
Not that night.  Not the other night.

Robert Sidarsky
Ellie, I think you're making a rather costly mistake.

Ellen Travis
(laughs)

The trust fund — is that what you're threatening me with?  Daddy... stick it up your ass.  You know what Susie called it?  “Blood money” — from the first time she bled when you held her down...

Robert Sidarsky
(holding his hand up)

Okay —

Ellen Travis
...just like you held me down.

Robert Sidarsky
Alright, that's enough.  It's ancient history.  Just let it rest.

Ellen Travis
I got news for you, Daddy.  It's not ancient history.  That woman detective you met?  I met her, too.  She convinced me to stay, and guess what?  She says that if I remember things now, a judge in New Jersey will tell my story to a grand jury.

Robert Sidarsky
Okay, listen, honey, please — look, I've got a new family.

Ellen Travis
I know.  That's why it's all come back up, just as if it happened yesterday... which is how it feels to me every day of my life.
(gets up and takes unfolds a piece of paper)

Robert Sidarsky
What is that?

Ellen Travis
My sister wrote this.  She mailed it to Denver, and my husband, whom you'll never meet, faxed it to me here.  Would you like me to read it to you?

Robert Sidarsky
No, what good would it do?

Ellen Travis
(angrily)

Do me some good!
(softens)
And Susie.

(Robert Sidarsky gestures for her to go ahead and read it)

Ellen Travis
(growing very emotional as she reads)

“Gretchen Quinn... born Susan Sidarsky... a frequent contributor to the “New York Ledger,” committed suicide Monday night.  She hopes her death will point an accusing finger at the men responsible.  In the end, nothing appealed to Ms. Quinn — no food, book or person.  She couldn't stand the sound of her thoughts or the touch of her own skin.”

Robert Sidarsky
What is this?

Ellen Travis
Susie's obituary.  She wrote it herself.
(continues to read)
“She is survived... by her ex-boyfriend, Dallas Warner, who was perfect — except for the wife and four kids; by Dr. Mark Daniels, the therapist, who knew her inside and out, literally and biblically; and last but not least, Robert Sidarsky... her father.”
(shoves the paper in Robert Sidarsky's face and grabs the lapels of his coat)

Robert Sidarsky
(trying to push her away)

Look, come on!

Ellen Travis
(crying and shaking her father)

“Her father...”!

Robert Sidarsky
That's enough.  Please!

Ellen Travis
“who took away her childhood, her virginity...”

Robert Sidarsky
Please, don't!

Ellen Travis
”her sense of safety and fairness in the world...”

Robert Sidarsky
Ellie...!

Ellen Travis
“Cause of death was from a fall — self-inflicted.
(sobbing)
She was 32.”
(grief-stricken and sobbing)
She was... 32.  She was 32, Daddy!

(Camera moves back and the scene fades with a shot of Benson — very affected by the scene behind her — leaning her back against the two-way mirror.  Ellen Travis and her father in the background.)

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28.07.2019 vers 18h

Zankaneli 
09.07.2019 vers 11h

boudou64 
27.06.2019 vers 19h

Mathry02 
24.06.2019 vers 17h

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Prochaines diffusions
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New York Unité Spéciale, S20E20 (inédit)
Mercredi 16 octobre à 22:50

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New York Unité Spéciale, S21E04 (inédit)
Jeudi 17 octobre à 22:00

Logo de la chaîne TF1

New York Unité Spéciale, S20E16 (inédit)
Mercredi 23 octobre à 22:50

Logo de la chaîne NBC

New York Unité Spéciale, S21E05 (inédit)
Jeudi 24 octobre à 22:00

Logo de la chaîne TF1

New York Unité Spéciale, S20E09 (inédit)
Mercredi 30 octobre à 22:50

Logo de la chaîne NBC

New York Unité Spéciale, S21E06 (inédit)
Jeudi 31 octobre à 22:00

Logo de la chaîne NBC

S21E07 (inédit)
Jeudi 7 novembre à 22:00

Dernières audiences
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Law & Order : Special Victims Unit, S21E03 (inédit)
Jeudi 10 octobre à 22:00
3.33m / 0.6% (18-49)

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Law & Order : Special Victims Unit, S21E02 (inédit)
Jeudi 3 octobre à 22:00
3.44m / 0.7% (18-49)

Logo de la chaîne NBC

Law & Order : Special Victims Unit, S21E01 (inédit)
Jeudi 26 septembre à 22:00
3.84m / 0.7% (18-49)

Toutes les audiences

Actualités
Diffusion US de l'épisode 21.03

Diffusion US de l'épisode 21.03
Ce soir, NBC continue la diffusion de la Saison 21 de "New-York Unité Spécial" avec l'épisode...

Diffusion FR du Mercredi 09/10/2019

Diffusion FR du Mercredi 09/10/2019
Ce soir, TF1 continue la diffusion de la Saison 20 de "New-York Unité Spéciale" avec un épisode...

Diffusion US de l'épisode 21.02

Diffusion US de l'épisode 21.02
Ce soir, NBC continue la diffusion de la Saison 21 de "New-York Unité Spécial" avec l'épisode...

Diffusion FR du Mercredi 02/10/2019

Diffusion FR du Mercredi 02/10/2019
Ce soir, TF1 continue la diffusion de la Saison 20 de "New-York Unité Spécial" avec un épisode...

Diffusion US de l'épisode 21.01

Diffusion US de l'épisode 21.01
Ça y est, on y est. C'est ce soir que NBC commence la diffusion de la Saison 21 de "New-York Unité...

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cinto, Hier à 18:03

vous avez des questions? posez-les à Henry VIII au sondage chez The Tudors. Merci pour votre vote. Et voyez la pdm, assez drôle!

cinto, Hier à 18:04

Changez le titre de la série Ma sorcière Bien Aimée en votant au sondage. Merci à ceux qui ont déja voté et à ceux qui vont le faire!

quimper, Hier à 20:45

Les quartiers Sherlock et Rizzoli & Isles proposent de nouvelles PDM. N'hésitez pas à passer

pretty31, Hier à 21:26

Les jeux d'Halloween vous attendent sur HypnoClap, et quelques chapeaux de sorcières sont encore disponibles pour "Un bonbon ou une cards ?"

pretty31, Hier à 21:26

qui vous permettra peut être de gagner ... Une HypnoCard ^^

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